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Trek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno - $600

Trek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 1 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 2 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 3 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 4 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 5 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 6 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 7 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 8 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 9 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 10 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 11 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 12 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 13 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 14 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 15 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 16 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 17 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 18 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 19 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 20 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 21 thumbnailTrek 5200 OCLV Carbon Road Bike - Mixed Components But Mostly Campagno 22 thumbnail
bicycle type: road
frame size: 60 cm
wheel size: 700C
bicycle frame material: carbon fiber
suspension: none (rigid)
brake type: caliper
handlebar type: bullhorn
electric assist: none
condition: good
make / manufacturer: Trek
model name / number: 5200
I purchased this as a frame and built it up to match all the other "modern" bikes in my stable - which had Campagnolo 9-speed drive trains and a smattering of parts from other makers. Part of the reason for this was my terrible body bio-ergonomics (read bad hips). I needed to arrange things so my Q-factor (distance between the pedals - stance) was as narrow as possible. This meant that Campy cranks of the time simply would not do and I ended up using a variety of older cranks with dead straight arms and square taper bottom brackets. I quickly stopped fretting about the parts not matching. This bike is one of the results. However, I can no longer ride and so I am trying hard to find this bike a good home. It is the very last of 10 or so bikes I had in my stable when I had to quit riding. This bike was the one I held onto longest as, perhaps not the most beautiful, but certainly the most functional and practical for my needs. I hope it can meet yours as well.

The Trek 5200 differed from the model 5000 (lower end) and 5500 (top end) only in the components installed. The OCLV frames were identical except paint and decals. So getting the mid-range frameset didn't bother me in the least, nor should it bother you. These frames were built early in the history of carbon fiber use in the bicycle industry. Trek knew they had alot to learn and built these frames conservatively - strong, solid, way more carbon than actually needed as a fudge factor than they use today. As a heavier guy, steeped in vintage steel bikes, this was very attractive to me as I remained suspicious of carbon at the time. With this frame, there was never a need to worry. While far from the lightest, it was always solid, comfortable, and behaved in a predictable and stable manner.

Part of this is due to Trek's design and frame geometry. I always road 58 cm frames and measured from the center of the bottom bracket spindle to the center of the joint with the top tube, along the seat tube's center. This frame is technically called a 60 cm by Trek. But Trek measures in what seems to me a strange (but not completely unique) way - they measure from the center of the bottom bracket spindle to the top of the seat tube where the seat post collar is positioned. Measured center-center, the way I always have, this bike's frame is a "square" 58 cm - meaning that the seat tube and top tube are very close to the same length. So if you ride a 58 cm or close, you should find this bike a pretty good fit if your body dimensions/distributions are normal. If you have shorter legs, you might want to try the Trek 58 cm (which is really more like a 56 cm). If you have a very long upper body and arms, you MIGHT want to consider a longer stem to compensate. I measure the wheelbase at 1 meter.

There is one well documented (see www dot roadbikereview dot com/threads/trek-bb-problem.349771/ for one discussion) issue with these frames: sometimes the aluminum tube in the bottom bracket into which the bottom bracket threads comes loose and the bottom bracket comes loose in the carbon. Before that happened to this frame, a good buddy - with tons of experience in both fiberglass and carbon layup and repair - had it happen to his model 5500. He fixed his and when he saw how upset I was with mine he kindly offered to fix mine even better than he did his own. Mostly this required re-epoxying the aluminum tube into the carbon using an epoxy paste, adding some additional carbon layup to the shell after removing the paint (using vacuum pumping to minimize left over resin), and replacing the small bolt that holds the cable guide in place with a larger one to provide additional resistance to it coming loose ever again. It never has. He then re-painted the shell in as close a green color of aircraft paint that he had. I actually like the result alot. But this explains what more experienced eyes will see when looking at the photos.

In the interests of full honesty and to make things easier for you to review, I partially disassembled the bike before cleaning and took a ton of pictures that reveal all sorts of angles on the frame itself. In addition to smaller set of lower resolution photos shown here, please peruse the much larger set of higher resolution photos I have posted here (drive dot google dot com/drive/folders/1WZa1uNd3JN7VR-V_zsHrKlIGDv2Q5K2b?usp=sharing). These also include videos of the spinning wheels on my truing stand so you can see their condition. And feel free to ask any questions.

Here is a more detailed list of the bike and components:

*Trek Model 5200 OCLV frame/fork - Trek size 60 cm - date of manufacture unknown but early on during the Lance Armstrong era
*Campy Chorus 9-Speed Ergo Levers, 2nd generation, with hoods still in fine shape - no rips/tears - and mechanically perfect
*Campy Veloce Dual Pivot Brake Calipers with Shimano 600 pads (I love those pads!)
*Campy Chorus 9-Speed Rear Derailleur
*Campy 9-Speed Rear Hub of unknown model - 32 holes, laced 3x using DT stainless butted spokes to Mavic Open Pro, SUP-Style rims
*Front Hub of unknown make/model - 32 holes, laced 3x using DT stainless butted spokes to Mavic Open Pro, SUP-Style rims
*Used but still quite viable Campy Veloce 9-Speed Cluster 13 x 26 - cogs can be replaced individually if needed
*170mm SR Apex retro, forged cranks configured "compact" gearing with 47 x 34 tooth x 86 BCD chain rings. Nice, straight arms for a narrow Q-factor - can easily be made into a triple, just need the chainring and a longer fixing bolt kit
*Shimano 105 Brazeon Front Derailleur mounted to the frame's brazeon using a little thing I designed and had built to allow the derailleur to be dropped down further than the brazeon would permit so as to enable the use of the "compact" gearing. There is no negative impact on front shifting which remains crisp and precise.
*Nashbar zero-setback, alloy seat post - amazingly quite nice - 27.2 mm standard
*Performance Titanium Quill Stem, nice 10 cm extension, very standard 26.0 mm bar clamp
*2 Black Elite Ciussi Bottle Cages
*Looks to be a Tange Japan Headset
*Still quite good Shimano UN-72 sealed Bottom Bracket - 110 mm axle - I believe this was an asymmetrical model, hence the right side spacing
*Well used but still smooth as silk, Look Original Delta Arc Cleat Pedals
*Unknown brand, allow handlebars, 43 cm wide for comfortable position and easy breathing - wrapped with black, artificial cork tape
*Wheels come with rim tape, tubes and tires - holds air - but immediate replacement of the rubber is recommended due to age - be safe!
*KMC X.93 chain with quick link
*Crappy, Fuji saddle included simply because a bike looks too strange without a saddle

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post id: 7753138204

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